facebook tracking Tag Archive

BlurFeaturesHow-TosPrivacy

Why is it O.K. for Facebook to force users to watch ads?

Facebook announced recently that it’s forcing users to watch ads even if they have ad-blockers installed in their web browsers by disabling the blocking.   The social media giant is stirring controversy by saying that it will serve ads to Facebook.com users with ad-blockers turned on.  It’s estimated that about 20% of U.S. web browser […]

Read More

Privacy

How Facebook buttons track you when you’re on other sites

You’re being followed online. Trackers follow you across the web, collecting and selling personal information like the articles you read, your favorite sites, your Facebook friends, your buying habits, and the videos you watch to build super-detailed profiles about you. Companies use these profiles for things ranging from merely annoying, like targeted online ads, to […]

Read More

Privacy

Update: answers from an Obama campaign employee to our privacy questions

Last week, we posted a list of open questions about how voters’ personal information was used in the 2012 presidential election (and how it’ll be used now that the election’s over). We posted the questions on our blog and on the social news site Reddit, and lo and behold, someone from the Obama campaign’s data […]

Read More

Uncategorized

Facebook still missing the most critical privacy setting after FTC settlement

After Facebook’s privacy settlement with the FTC, what you do on Facebook will be more protected.  That’s good news, but it doesn’t address the fact that Facebook tracks its members (and even non-members) off Facebook.  And Facebook knows more about your internet activity than ever before. There is no privacy setting anywhere in Facebook that […]

Read More

Uncategorized

USA Today uncovers Facebook tracking: we stop it

The secret’s out:  Facebook tracks you everywhere you go online for 90 days, even when you’re logged out, even if you’re not a member.  USA Today’s Byron Acohido shared the story today. We hate to say we told you so, but we did:  we blogged about this problem over a month ago–not once, but twice–and […]

Read More