An unromantic truth: Survey shows people are hesitant to share their online passwords with significant others

Privacy

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valentinesDayLove may be in the air this Valentine’s Day, but a recent study by Abine shows that Americans are often times more comfortable giving flowers to their significant others than their online passwords. 31% reported they would change their password immediately if their significant other gained access to it while 20 percent have flat out refused to give these credentials to their better half. So much for ‘what’s mine is yours.’  

Online passwords: The findings

Online banking and personal email seem to be the most sensitive accounts in this regard, as only 13% of Americans are comfortable giving their significant other their bank account password, and only 14% would consider sharing their email password. barChart

 

 

Others will gladly share the keys to their digital selves, regardless of the potential backlash should the relationship dissolve – 59% of those polled have shared an online password with a significant other at least once, a majority of which (57%) were married.

The overwhelming number of recent data breaches in America has called nearly every aspect of consumer privacy into question putting a spotlight on the very real potential of identity theft. The sage advice to ‘trust no one’ has undoubtedly influenced our decision to share (or rather, not to share) our digital selves – even with those close to us that don’t pose a threat.

“These results show a growing concern for personal privacy, even among those who we feel most secure with.  Leading password managers like Blur, Lastpass, and Dashlane are making it easier to share passwords safely and to change them more easily.  Even loved ones need more control over  their online identity and are wary of over-sharing ,” says Rob Shavell, CEO of Abine. Additional findings from the survey include:

  • pieChart21% of married respondents would change their password immediately after a significant other gains access
  • 26% of unmarried respondents would change their password immediately after a significant other gains access
  • 24% of unmarried respondents are comfortable with their significant other having access to their online passwords
  • Respondents were the most likely (19%) to be comfortable sharing their Facebook account when asked to choose amongst email, online banking or Facebook account
  • 19% of married people have refused to give their significant other login credentials on more than one occasion

 

Online Passwords: The Methodology

The findings are based on a Valday survey of more than 1,000 respondents over the age of 18 in the U.S. Valday Surveys automatically field a validated, representative sample of respondents and allocate users according to the demographic spread of U.S. Census data of Internet users.


Abine is the online privacy company. Abine has for years been committed to providing consumers with innovative and comprehensive privacy solutions meant for everyday web users. Abine’s solutions have been trusted by over 25 million people worldwide to protect and control their passwords, privacy, and identity. Get Blur.

One Reply to “An unromantic truth: Survey shows people are hesitant to share their online passwords with significant others”

  1. Mary Loh says:

    I Completely Agree with the above post. It is good and important to restrict your privacy while you are dating with the popular sites like http://www.conciergeintroductions.com limiting sharing with significant others can be helpful to save your relationship.

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